Macbeth

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Macbeth ran a large bed and breakfast with his wife in the Scottish Highlands. He was a happy man coz he had his own walking forest (and train). Plus he lived in the Sextion C o' Scotland.

In 1560, Shakespeare wrote an incendiary libel by the same name. It untruthfully dealt with the life of the real Macbeth, count-o'-the-century, using cardboard props and puppets to tell the story. Ophelia guest-starred, just beating out Massie Block for the part.

Shakespeare pulled out all the stops for this'n, with a banquet ghost, Weird Sisters (ripped off from American television's Charmed), angst (wal, they're Scots, ain't they?) and subtle references to Irn-Bru. This made the whole entirely forgettable. It was reported that English Queen Elizabeth I had a good larf, but that might have been from seeing that Braveheart fellow's kit when he bent over to pick up something he dropped. Still, it was enough to bring a Glasgow smile to anyone's pasty face.

Teachers love to set the Macbeth libel on literary analysis exams because they get to kill the students and their extended family afterwards for no reason. They can't get the blood orf, tho' ('cept if they use soap). Somehow, the story also became part of an American hotelkeeping course, resulting in that awful but humorous Bates Motel business. Norman?

WHAT IF A MOVIE HAD NO PLOT BUT MADE UP FOR IT WITH ITS CHARM? PROLLY COULD.


"To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable...

Hold on, I have to get the phone...

No, you want Shookspeare. He's 9122.

N..., no problem. Bye.

...

Lost my place."


(Exeunt) //free memory