.net Magazine

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.net is a British glossy magazine of Potatochop tutorials, mouse mat reviews and guides on how to eject the CD-ROM from the drive.

Free gifts[edit]

.net is also known for the free software it gives away on an attached cover CD. In the past it has offered garden landscaping programs, Microsoft Paint and even full suites of Lotus software, complete with brain-melting yellow 'retro' visuals.

The magazine also often features centre-page glossy posters and items such as wallcharts aiding the design of websites, CD towers, and even collectable Top Trumps cards featuring such figures as The Apple Corporation, Microsoft Sam and The Linux Penguin.

The most popular free gift to date, however, has been the cut out and keep life size cardboard figure of Tim Berners-Lee, which included real foldable limbs so owners could make him hold their chips, do push ups and even recode the whole Internet.[1] Surprisingly, the price of the magazine skyrocketed to £13 after this issue.

From time to time, the magazine attempts to entice subscribers by offering deals on domain name hosting. Should one decide to subscribe during this limited period they receive a free Geocities subdomain with extra adspam, perfect for the first time web designer and general idiot.

Features[edit]

Each issue has a cover feature, which is often an interview with figures prominent in the world of computing and technology. Past notable interviewees include G. Samuel Blog, creator of the weblog, Peter Kay, inventor of tinternet and, most famously, Clippit, the Microsoft paperclip. The latter of which gave a fascinating insight into the history of the Microsoft Corporation and even gave advice on how to write, organise and format a formal letter.

Security[edit]

The 'security' section of the magazine focuses on the latest threats to web users and their computers. Resident experts answer such taxing questions as "should I padlock my computer to protect from hackers?", give advice on how to go fishing and what measures should be taken should students choose to hack University computers to change their grades.

Aol Disks[edit]

In the interest of the environment, the magazine runs a monthly feature on how to correctly dispose or make use of unwanted AOL discs. Readers are urged to send their suggestions and one is selected and featured each month. Among the more humorous have been:

  • Drinks coaster in a technology/American themed pub
  • Frisbees for pets
  • Replacement wheels for a Citroen 2CV
  • Vanity mirror

The December 2006 edition featured a bumper special collection of the best home made AOL disk creations and included special tips on how to baste your turkey, decorate your Christmas tree and warm plates with them.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. Only with the additional cardboard keyboard, given away free with the next issue.

See also[edit]

External Links[edit]